PureGold LATO Sea Grapes 230g
PureGold LATO Sea Grapes 230g
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, PureGold LATO Sea Grapes 230g
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, PureGold LATO Sea Grapes 230g

PureGold LATO Sea Grapes 230g

Regular price
$4.98
Sale price
$4.98
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 

This delectable seaweed that looks like tiny grapes is called lato or caulerpa lentillifera. It’s very popular in the Philippines and in Japan they call it umi-budo. Lato is an unusual looking and enigmatic seaweed. It’s not obvious at first sight, but they are edible and delicious. Caulerpa lentillifera, Sea Grapes, Latok, and Green Caviar are a few of the names for lato. It is a seaweed well known to the Philippines and close by countries. This seaweed variety is the main ingredient for a popular Filipino salad called “Ensaladang Lato” which translates to Seaweed Salad. This seaweed doesn’t grow on the seashore but in intertidal zones, close to mangroves. That kind of site is common in Palawan (Located in the Philippines) and the water temperature is perfect for the lato as it rarely goes down under 29 degrees Celcius. Lato seaweed grows at the bottom of the sea, between 3 and 5 meters deep, 3 meters for low tide, 5 meters for high tide. Where is lato seaweed from? Lato Seaweed is very sensitive to cold. This survives in temperatures ranging around 20 to 35 degrees Celsius. Therefore, if kept in the refrigerator, it tends to wither due to cold. Lato Seaweed is mainly available in Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, and Japan. It is also distributed in tropical areas like Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Somalia, South Africa, Tanzania and Papua New Guinea. Lato Seaweed is one of the best types of eaten Caulerpa due to its soft and succulence They are also called as sea-grape and green-caviar. They are also known as sea grapes or green caviar. It is farmed in the Philippines, where it is locally called ar-arosep,lato,arosep or ar-arosip (as variant names), It can also be found In the Malaysian state of Sabah, where locally it is known as Latok. The pond cultivation of Lato seaweed has been very successful on Mactan Island, Cebu, in the central Philippines, with markets in Cebu and Manila. About 400 ha of ponds are under cu